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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 13, 2009 12:00pm EST
of the same name. other books include abraham and where god was born. his latest is called "america's profit." >> great to be back. >tavis: why is moses america's prophet? >> i had spent a decade traveling around the middle east looking at this kind of combustion of religion and politics and it seemed the debate was headquartered in the middle east. transferred back here. americans were in this, and ground this time i'd like -- i began, my wife gave birth to identical twins and we saw people, we had to go to them to get some help. when i went on board there was this guy reading the bible. i said what are you reading and he said texas. -- exodus. in my home town there is a letter from george washington where he credits the success in the revolution to the same god who freed the israelites. here is moses in the middle of the revolution. i kept saying ben franklin recruiting moses. harriet tubman all the way through to dr. king comparing himself to moses. i was shocked by the number of references and i said i should go through this journey and retrace influenced more americans. his name is mose
PBS
Nov 17, 2009 7:00pm EST
>> paul: when it comes to bank of america's shotgun wedding to merrill lynch, congress is again debating who was pulling the trigger. some say it was bank of america; others blame regulators for pushing a deal at any cost. >> suzanne: with just a tiny increase in prices paid to factories, farmers, and other producers, the inflation picture remains tame, but could an uptick in prices be welcome news for the fed? we ask an economist. >> paul: general electric is getting ready to say so long to nbc-universal. a look tonight at why g.e. is making the move. >> suzanne: then, a big win for an american car maker. we'll tell you who took top honors in motortrend's car of year, and why that could push its sales even higher. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> suzanne: and i'm suzanne pratt. susie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly business report" for tuesday, november 17. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> suzanne: good evening, everyone. in late
PBS
Nov 23, 2009 12:35pm EST
prize winning columnist and best selling author tom friedman. >> what worries me about america today, charlie, is that we are produces suboptimal solutions to all our big problems. whether it is called health care. whether it's called financial regulation, whether it's call debt, whether it's called energy and climate. where asa because it has an authoritarian system run by engineers, not lawyers, can actually order through awe tore -- author toreian means in many case morse optimal solutions. >> rose: we turn to the middle east with two respected experts and authors eugene rogan and stephen cohen. >> people in the arab world who have continued to really hope to see a new dawn where they might take command of their own future and what not are finding themselves more powerless than ever. and there's a deep sense of malaise particularly after the war in iraq. that really has been radicalizing politics. making people feel like they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confrontation
PBS
Nov 2, 2009 5:30pm EST
in america and around the grob. later, blood diamonds. campaigners say human rights abuses in zimbab we mean it should be kicked out of international gem markets. a booming oil business in texas and melting glaciers in the himalayas. two sides of the climate change debate. >> hello to ending weeks of uncertain, hamid karzai is declared the winner of afghanistan's election. with his only rival out of the race, the runoff triggered by first-round fraud has been abandoned but leaves a mess of questions unanswered. president obama has spoken to president karzai isaiah about corruption and about writing a new cheapter. the latest from washington in a moment. first this from kabul. >> it's cost millions of pounds and dozens of lives to get to this moment and it came in a small, packed room on the outskirts of kabul. >> we declare that mr. hamid karzai, which got the majority of votes in the first round and he is the only candidate for the second round of elections for afghanistan in 2009, be declared the elected president of afghanistan. >> the heads of the election board was besieged with questio
PBS
Nov 11, 2009 12:00pm EST
to honor america's war veterans tomorrow, i am pleased to welcome on to the show a decorated vietnam war vet, who lost both of his legs and one arm while serving his country in vietnam, max cleland. he has his new memoir, "heart of a patriot," and is good to have you on the program. i saw your op-ed ppiece. we know that earlier today, president obama and forceless michelle obama went to fort hood. -- and first lady michelle obama went to fort hood. your thoughts? >> first of all, the president should go to fort hood. these are his troops. these are our troops. they were killed by a man who went off of the edge. it was a terrorist act. whether the individual himself was a terrorist, we do not know, but it was a terrorist act. it created terror. there was obviously something going on in his mind that comported with what was going on in his mind, and that triggered him. it was going on in his mind for awhile. he had not wanted to go to war against his compatriots in many ways, so he took out as much of america and the american war machine in his mind that he could. the problem is he killed
PBS
Nov 6, 2009 7:00pm EST
: one out of every ten workers in america is not working. and not by choice. today's data show almost 16 million of people are looking for jobs a harsh reminder of the pain caused by the great recession. economist bruce kasman warns things are likely to get worse. >> i think it's a reasonable chance that by the time the labor market reaches its worst point, we are actually going to have the worst labor market that we've had in the united states since the great depression. and that's a pretty sobering reality. >> reporter: speaking of sobering, by one measure, the jobless rate is actually closer to 17.5%. that's the figure, if you include part-timers who would rather be full-time and people so discouraged looking for work, they've given up. however, today's report did have some glimmers hope. though the economy lost 190,000 jobs last month, that's still well below january's peak. economist milton ezrati says the creation of 34,000 temporary position in october is also a positive sign. >> what happens is-- at a turn in the economy-- and there's good evidence that we are seeing a turn towar
PBS
Nov 13, 2009 5:30pm EST
/11 are not just obvious, but the wounds remain etched and america is still waiting for justice. the man accused of being the mastermind of the attacks, khalid sheikh mohammed, this is how he looked after he was arrested in pakistan in 2003. this is how he looks now. this is where he will now stand trial, a new york federal court house just a stone's throw away from where the attacks took place. if found guilty, he can expect the harshest sentence. >> i expect prosecutors to seek the death penalty against each of the alleged conspirators. >> a jury of new yorkers will help decide whether he is guilty or not, but it seems some in the city have already made up their mind. >> i hope he gets a fair trial. >> it should be in new york were the key event occurred and allow the citizens of new york to witness firsthand the administration of justice. >> it is a clear break from the past. this is where he and the currently accused are currently being held. it is also where the five were being tried by a military court. the obama administration rejected to the way some evidence was obtained. the president
PBS
Nov 18, 2009 5:30pm EST
to the polls. welcome to," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, is new technology the answer for all the farmers? japan's search for answers to food dependency. and not exactly an old master, london's data rate retreats amsterdam's red light district for exhibition. -- london's museum recreate amsterdam's red light district for an exhibition. >>> it is official, the deadline for closing the hugely controversial prison at guantanamo bay, cuba, two months away, will not be met. president obama has confirmed the commitment that he made so publicly came to office will not be fulfilled in time. jonathan beall is at guantanamo bay. >> the reason for the delay is still filtering through. we do not know if the detainees have been informed, but the military commanders are aware. it does not come as a huge surprise because they know that president obama wanted to close it. they know there has been a huge obstacle in the way, the biggest one, where the put the detainees instead? there are still 200. where will they go, where will they be tried? these questions are still to be
PBS
Nov 19, 2009 12:00pm EST
that come from? i do not know. it is fun. it is just fun. race is the most important thing in america. it really is. what i get out of an audience in 15 minutes a psychiatrist cannot get out of them in 15 years. you'll sit and listen about sex, religion, you think things are taboo, and they will sit there and listen and will not open their mouths, do not respond. but you talk about race and will flip in five, 10 minutes. >> why is race a fertile ground to navigate? >> because america is caught up in it. we are a melting pot. there are so many different nationalities, so many different races, people of different colors, it is just fun. tavis: when people think that you are being in politics, paul is being kilobit and politic -- paul is being a little bit incorrect, what you say? >> i am a comedian. people are like saints. we make people's lives better. it is true, without us, you guys would be miserable. especially in the political arena now. our economy, the way the world is, we need comedians. tavis: where does paul mooney find funny? >> in life. the funny it is in life. it is in thi
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 10:00pm EST
what lessons we can learn to fix america's sick, sick health care system. i've covered the world as a foreign correspondent, and right now i'm writing a book about health care systems overseas. first stop on my tour is great britain, where our family lived for five years. even though the uk is our closest european ally, its health care solution that is, the government-run national health service-- may seem too close to socialism for most americans. still, we can learn something here. for about half of what we pay per person, the nhs covers everybody and has somewhat better health statistics, longer life expectancy, lower infant mortality. britain's national health service is dedicated to the proposition that you should never have to pay a medical bill. in the nhs, there's no insurance premium, no co-pay, no fee at all. the system covers everybody. and, you know, when we lived here, my family got really good care from the nhs, although we often had to wait to see a doctor. and yet the newspapers here are full of nhs horror stories-- rationing, waiting lists, terrible mistakes. so
PBS
Nov 3, 2009 12:35pm EST
holeryness is well known in america having received the congressional gold medal and met with the past three presidents. he's on his sixth viz hit in the united states. it began in new orleans where he attended a symposium on pollution in the mississippi river. he travel new york where he met with ban ki-moon. tomorrow in washington he will meet with president obama and attend diners in his honor by the secretary of state and vice president. in 2008 he published a book called "encounter the mystery: understanding orthodox christianity today." i met him with in atlanta last week at the c.e.o. of coca-cola, a turkish citizen whose father was a distinguished turkish diplomat. the conversation began with a question about his role as he saw it. tell me about your role. >> by the grace of god i am the first bishop in the whole orthodox church worldwide. you may knee in the orthodox church we have the principal of the independent churches which are free to coordinate and organize their internal affairs. the local churches elect their primate and the role of the ecumenical patriarch as it is histori
PBS
Nov 9, 2009 5:30pm EST
to our viewers in pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up later for you -- and illegal raid under the cover of darkness. why heritage groups are trying to prevent fragments from the past from disappearing forever. and the giants indelicacy that fetched a mouthwatering some at an auction -- eight giant -- a gienat delicacy. hello. it has been a day of celebration and remembering, and the once divided city of berlin, and the heart of the once divided continent of europe. in its 28 years the berlin wall signified repression and fear but on this night in 1989 the first crossing point opened and berliners surged through, effectively marking the end of a communist empire. worrell leaders gathered in the pouring rain at the brandenburg gate to mark the moment. >> and new generation celebrating freedom and the end of the world order they never knew. the berlin wall to these children just something from the history books or recollections of their parents and grandparents. my find them, world leaders striding through the brandenburg gate, once the border between east and west berlin.
PBS
Nov 12, 2009 5:30pm EST
for president. there could be an election early next year. deciding america's strategy for afghanistan is one of the top decisions that barack obama has to make. if could define his presidency -- it could define his presidency. >> in a memo to the white house, the ambassador has urged against sending more troops. that advice is counter to the wishes of the top u.s. general in afghanistan. >> it is his most agonizing decision to date, whether to send thousands of more troops to afghanistan. over 800 have already died there. in his search for an answer, the president is leaving no stone unturned. he had 8 separate meetings with his war council, discussions with his most senior advisers. a slow but a very deliberate process behind closed doors. a memo from america's ambassador warns the president not to send more troops without progress by the afghan government in tackling corruption. more proof that the president's advisers are split. >> it has taken a long time to make this decision. during that time, support for the war has decreased especially amongst his core constituents. >> this is a comp
PBS
Nov 16, 2009 5:30pm EST
speech is a universal right. from beijing -- >> he is here to say america out welcomes the rise of a new power in the east. barack obama once china as a partner, not a rival. today, he took his message direct to china's people, something it china's leaders never do. a public forum with students in shanghai. the white house wanted it is shown live on tv nationwide,. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation, the freedoms of expression and warship, access to information and political participation, we believe our universal rights. they should be available to all people. >> control is still china's instinct. >> she was able to meet him. her husband was detained a year ago and is still under arrest. >> we think president obama will not raise human-rights issues in earnest because doing this with china is more important. >> president obama will tread carefully in beijing, well aware his communist partners are more comfortable for king strength than listening to criticism america's relationship with china is perhaps the most important with any nation in the world
PBS
Nov 16, 2009 7:00pm EST
through cost-cutting and improved sales in asia and latin america. still, the c.e.o. was disappointed by the quarterly loss. >> it's certainly better than our plan going into bankruptcy. but none the less it's a loss and you can not be satisfied with it. >> reporter: the outlook next year for g.m. is a bit murky. u.s. auto sales could have trouble gaining traction if unemployment keeps rising and consumer confidence keeps falling. lindland is encouraged by the progress g.m. is making and is optimistic the company will break even next year or possibly turn a profit. >> once they sort of bit the bullet and went through bankruptcy the american public as actually responded pretty well. their sales did not decline as much as we expected. so, i think when we look at their prospects given the worse they've been through and now they're coming out of it. >> reporter: g.m. thinks an initial public stock offering could come by the middle of next year, provided the capital markets improve and auto sales shift out of neutral. diane eastabrook, "nightly business report" chicago. >> susie: meanwhile
PBS
Nov 17, 2009 5:30pm EST
, economic problems, and nuclear proliferation. no breakthroughs. >> side-by-side, america's president and china's. a superpower and its rising rival. ♪ they are increasingly block instead, their economies in twined. they said the challenges can only be tackled if they work together. these two nations, the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases agreed to push for climate change in copenhagen next month. >> much still separates them, too. president obama is easy with a free press, but china is not. no questions were allowed. >> our aim in the copenhagen is not a political declaration but rather an accord that covers all of the issues in the negotiations and has immediate of fax. >> he then raised the sensitive subject of >>tibet. the chinese president hinted at chinese irritation that america is trying to protect its markets. >> i stressed to president obama that our two countries need to oppose and reject protectionism in all of its manifestations. >> that mr. obama headed to the forbidden city. it the crowds were kept away. all the run president obama, signs of china's past pow
PBS
Nov 23, 2009 5:30pm EST
. >> it is more than six years as britain and america sent forces to topple the government of saddam hussein. it was one of the most controversial foreign-policy decisions of recent decades. >> we will stand up for what we know to be right. >> then-prime minister tony blair believes passionately the war was justified. >> others thought differently, and hundreds of thousands marched in the streets of britain in protest. now five privy councilors, all appointed by downing street, will investigate how and why britain went to war. they insist they are not government's placement. they say the inquiry will not be a whitewash. >> when you set up an independent inquiry of this sort, you said the members free to do what they will. our determination is to do, not merely a thorough job, but one that is frank and will bear public scrutiny. >> inquiry will hear from key witnesses, people like the former ambassador to the united nations, the former chairman of the political committee empowered chief of mi6, and the chief of mi6 a the time of invasion. examinations show there were critical shortcomings. on
PBS
Nov 25, 2009 5:30pm EST
greenhouse gas emissions. and they hope his visit will remake america's image as the most skeptical and greenhouse gas emissions. it doesn't seem likely that treatly will emerge from copenhagen, but yesterday mr. obama said he did want a firm political agreement from copenhagen that would take the world towards the climate change treaty next year. >> with two weeks before the beginning of copenhagen, it is essential that all countries do what is necessary to reach a strong operational agreement that will confront the threat of climate change while serving as a stepping stone to a legally-binding treaty. >> the president will take with him a set of targets for cuts in greenhouse emissions, again, something the rest of the world has wanted for a long time. he will offer to cut emissions by 17% from 2005 levels by "20/20" and 83% by 2050. congress has not yet passed legislation which by make those cuts law in the united states. that is a battle still to be fought in washington. but the administration is clearly hoping that both domestic laws and an international treaty or attainable pe
PBS
Nov 4, 2009 12:35pm EST
foreign leaders who stop at this table they worry about the deficit. does america have too much debt that it cannot bring the political will to do something about it. >> rose: well, let's realize we actually have two deficits. one is the fiscal deficit this which we need to bring down, but we also have this g.d.p. deaf which we are trying to work our way out of. >> rose: explain the g.d.p. deficit meaning. >> there's a gap between how much the economy could produce and how much it's currently producing which at the beginning of this year was estimated to amount to more than a trillion dollars. to start to fill that hole, we had to take steps like the recovery act to try to get the economy back on its feet. so the problem would be challenging if it were just a fiscal one. but we have the dual deficits and need to address both. and that makes it even more challenging. >> rose: because the current accounts deficit as well. >> which is a reflection... now one of the striking things is we really are living in an exceptional time. normally higher budget deficits-- and, again, last year we
PBS
Nov 19, 2009 6:00pm EST
.com. >> what makes us an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the senate geared up today for the real battle over health care reform. democratic leaders hoped to get their new bill to the floor-- nearly 10 months after the process began. "newshour" health correspondent betty ann bowser has our lead story report. >> this is a big bill it affects everybody in america. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid and fellow democrats edged closer today to moving a 2,000-page health care reform bill to the floor for debate. >> we all acknowledge this legislation is a tremendous step forward. >> reporter: reid unveiled the legislation last night with final cost estimates from the
PBS
Nov 24, 2009 10:00pm EST
's from bank of america. and on the back it says 0% intro apr. >> yes, but there is an asterisk or whatever that mark, so i have to now read that footnote. i will have to remove my glasses to read it. it says, "for this, see disclosure summary insert for details." now i have to find a disclosure summary, which is the one here. so, on the outside, it says 0% intro apr; in here, it says that my apr is 11.9%, 15.9%, or 19.9%, right, and "the apr you receive is determined based on your credit worthiness," so i have no idea which one i am going to get when they approve me. >> bergman: so, disclosure, you say, doesn't work? >> i mean, look at how much time it takes for both of us to go through this. >> bergman: yeah, exactly. >> i think that your average consumer is not going to be able to translate what the real pricing is. >> bergman: now, you put out statements like this from providian. >> we did. we did, absolutely. >> bergman: well, the criticism is that it's exploiting the customer, the fact that they don't really understand what's going to happen. >> in a way, i will say yes. i
PBS
Nov 5, 2009 7:00pm EST
think china, india or in pick up steam and doing a very good job. latin america, varies by country. bazz il doing pretty well. mexico tied to the u.s., a little bit more challenging. europe was perhaps the biggest surprise. i felt that europe would lag behind the u.s. by two and maybe three quarters. we saw some good trends in northern europe, southern europe still kind of challenged. >> let me talk to you a little bit about competition. ibm and hewlett-packard used to be sysco partners but not any more. as they try to catch this wave of tech spending, is that going to make things difficult for cisco, are we going to see a clash of the tech titans? >> the exciting thing about what cisco is doing is if you look down to the consumer level we're competing against very good companies like apple. steve jobs actually brought our flip product on stage the other day and said it is the first time he has ever done that and said here say very good company, but we're going to beat them. that is a good compliment and a shot across the bow. you begin to think about where we are going in the data cente
PBS
Nov 6, 2009 5:30pm EST
and intimidation in iran. welcome to "bbc world news." broadcast you our viewers in pbs -- on pbs in america. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- the fight at a french tourist attraction. and what will put a smile on the british upper lip? how fighter pilots kept their spirits up during the second world war. hello. lots of questions today, and no real answers as to why an army psychiatrist went on a killing spree against his own comrades. killed 13 -- major nadal malik hasan killed a 13 in fort hood in texas. he has not been killed, contrary to previous reports. he is on a ventilator in hospital. we have this report. >> the sound of the wake up call, as they do every morning, but this was no normal day at fort hood. this was the scene here yesterday. swat teams swarmed across parts of the base, taking cover as panic spread in a place that is meant to be out of harm's way. this is america's biggest military base. it is home to more than 150,000 soldiers and their families. the attack started at 1:30 in the afternoon. target major nadal malik hasan soldiers as they were being checke
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 5:30pm EST
's name. welcome to bbc world news. coming up later, no windows, no crew, america's latest pirate fighting machine. the subway passenger turned out to be a very lucky woman. >> he honored the memory of the dead in public and private, speaking their names and telling their stories as he denounced the twisted logic that led to their death. the u.s. president speaking in fort hood, texas at a memorial service for those that were shot. hasan is accused of the attack. president obama offered personal tributes for the way the victims lived and a service to their country. ♪ >> let's cross to washington, our special correspondent has more. >> before president obama spoke, the army chief of staff said that this of violence was unimaginable. he said it was a kick in the gut for america's armed forces. president obama's tribute was short and simple. this was not the place to look at the motivation of the shooting. he chose to characterize the spasm of violence. >> it might be hard to comprehend the twisted logic that led to this tragedy but this much we do now -- no fath justifies these murderous a
PBS
Nov 11, 2009 5:30pm EST
world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up, keeping swine flu at bay. and stepping into the spotlight, kenya's fashion designers make use of the surge in demand. >>> hello. in music, spoken word, countries around the globe have been marking armistice day, the end of world war room and one in 1918. with current conflicts in mind, there was striking visual reminder of how far europe has come. for the first time, french and german leaders stood side by side to honor the fallen. >> it is 91 years since the guns fell silent and the great war. for the first time, the leaders of france and germany came to mark this day of commemoration together. under the arctic triumph, nicolas sarkozy and angela merkel reinforced their friendship. two days ago, the french president was in berlin for the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. >> the end of the first world war and the fall of the berlin wall remind us that we must always fight for the valuable goods of peace and freedom, that we need to defend the values with democracy and human rights, and we keep
PBS
Nov 12, 2009 7:00pm EST
. >> paul: that's why the pres ent's planning a jobs summit, searching for ways to get america back to work. will it work? some answers tonight from a political economist. >> susie: intel and advanced micro devices kiss and make up, ending a years-long dispute over computer chip sales. but will their deal take government anti-trust heat off of intel? >> paul: gold pushed to a new record overnight, north of $1,100 an ounce. so, how best to invest in the shining star of the commodities market? we get some answers. >> susie: then, from the printed page to the electronic one, the plot thickens in the publishing industry. and with the industry's business model up for grabs, there's a lot at stake. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> susie: and i'm susie gharib. this is "nightly business report" for thursday, november 12. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. creating jobs for americans is now job number one for president obama. he a
PBS
Nov 16, 2009 12:00pm EST
that every financial adviser in america is a crock. that is not what i am saying. you are the first line of defense. you may able to find people that you can trust that will help you and put your interests ahead of their own. there is always a risk that the government and other regulators that are supposed to be watching out for your interests will do it as good a job this time as they did last time. when you add those things together, you are the one that has to be vigilant and take charge and take control in order to be reasonably sure that you are going to be protected. tavis: who are the con artists you are talking about that we need to conquer? >> they are on your phone, they are probably in your neighborhood. they are anybody that promises you something that sounds to be good to be true. it sounds to be good to be true, it probably is. i do not think that saying is true. if it sounds to be good to be true, it definitely is. there are people out there making promises that are too good to be true. you have to control the temptation to listen to those people and ask yourself, if they
PBS
Nov 19, 2009 5:30pm EST
that support services like finance and public relations in north america and europe, and the chief executive officer is dr. monashaka, a fire beneath the rebel movement, providing the ideological fuel that keeps it burning in the congo, but he lives in germany. tuesday, german police arrested are him on suspicion of war crimes. >> >> the captain knows death only too well. he used to be in charge of officer training. >> in the fdlr courts, there was an order in a telegram and if the fdlr is attacked they attack villages so the international community will pay attention to what's happening and forced to negotiate. >> they were ordered, in effect, to commit war crimes. >> fdlr has remained because they have the resources. they encourage the people in the field to kill and rape every day. these are crimes! they should be prosecuted. it is just a matter of being curious about it and following through. >> the u.n. seess it as a criminal organization from the congo is being run from the heart of europe. the fdlr's executive secretary rrk the second most powerful man in the organization lives in par
PBS
Nov 4, 2009 6:00pm EST
usually protest against the revolution's old enemy: america. but these demonstrators are doing the opposite: protesting against their own regime and then running away with notorious basij militia, armed with batons and riot shields, in hot pursuit. the police had warned reformists not to exploit this anniversary. but it didn't work, so they moved in hitting this man on the pavement, and beating women. one is hit to the ground. a man who tries to intervene is dragged away by the hair. and then a woman takes her life into her own hands. >> ( translated ): there were many injured ladies who were hit very severely. they even followed people into residential buildings, i saw them forcing locks and breaking glass. the issue has changed. it is not about the election any more. it is about freedom of expression. >> reporter: the protesters fought back by filming what they could; and what they've posted on the internet contradicts the official version of events. outside the old u.s. embassy there was the traditional revolutionary rally. thousands of students were bussed in and shouted "d
PBS
Nov 11, 2009 12:35pm EST
was the first international financial crisis. >> rose: are you suggesting america could default? >> well, i think we might inflate. that's how it's done when you're a rich modern economy. we'd really is to back ourselves into a corner to default. we did it once before in 1933 when franklin roosevelt said "you know how gold was $20 an ounce? now it's $35 an ounce." if you were living somewhere else, that sure felt like a default. >> rose: there are people writing that we may run out of money, so to speak. >> it's not that we're going to run out of money. we're rich. we can afford to pay our debts. we can afford to pay twice as much. the question is do we have the will? and will people on the outside-- chinese and others who invest in us-- believe we have the will to pay our debts? because you run into problems way before you think you should. you don't hit the limits that you think would be possible. you run into problems where you just can't refinance your debt. and you say "i'll pay, i'll pay. but the creditors don't believe you. >> rose: so the bottom line, america has too much debt? >> o
PBS
Nov 16, 2009 12:35pm EST
at the peak of the worst economic crisis since the great depression. at that time, hides that america had been struck by an economic pearl harbor but much has chked since then, and he's here to tell us how he views a global and american economy in recovery. last week berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all of burlington northern santa fe railroad, the largest acquisition in company history. he called the deal an all-out wager on the american economy. he is in new york for a town hall event he held with bill gates yesterday. he graciously agreed to stay over an extra night and i am pleased to have a good friend of mine back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been, certainly from the middle of 2008 to the middle of 2009, one incredible year. >> one incredible year. ( laughter ) once in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tell me about it for you. >> well, it was-- it really was an extraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever seen, and probably in certain respects there
PBS
Nov 17, 2009 12:35pm EST
argument that economists always use which is america has to consume less and china has to consume more. this may be true from an economic point of view, but if we consume less, their exports decline. that has a huge impact on their employment situation. as they consume more, it has a major impact on the surrounding countries and their ties to china. so what that phrase really means is a shift in overall relationships. that is what is new in the situation. it's not any individual decision that can be taken. >> rose: so what should the dialogue be about? >> well, i think the relationship with china is good and the administration has conducted it appropriately. and, well, there's a big cultural difference between china and the united states in any administration. the chinese look at foreign policy and strategy as a continuing process extended over a long period of time. carefully assessed as to its purposes. american foreign policy generally is conducted as a series of pragmatic solutions to individual problems that emerge that change and then they are dropped and some other issues comes
PBS
Nov 18, 2009 12:35pm EST
discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he met with president hu jintao in beijing. the two leaders held a press conference, though neither took questions afterwards. here's a part of what they said. >> ( translated ): to preserve and promote the growth of this relationship is a shared responsibility for both china and the united states. the chinese side is willing to work with the u.s. side to ensure the sustained, sound, and steady growth of this relationship to the greater benefits of peoples of our two countries and people throughout the world. >> the major challenges of the 21st century, from climate change to nuclear proliferation to economic recovery ar
PBS
Nov 25, 2009 6:00pm EST
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
PBS
Nov 9, 2009 6:00pm EST
disagreements with america or with foreign terrorist groups. there are a wide range of leads being run down. >> gwen: we have heard today that major hasan is conscious and talking. have any of the investigators been able to talk to him yet? >> not so far. he has a military lawyer who's asked first of all for the investigation to be moved, he can't get a fair trial given the publicity and president obama is going down to ft. hood tomorrow. >> gwen: there has been much reporting and commentary about potential links between major hasan and people who link themselveses to terrorism. what can you tell us based on your reporting? >> we are hearing a lot more, and what we can say right now is that among the focuses is major hasan's crossing paths with the northern virginia iman who has left the country and is an american-born iman, but has emerged as one of the leading promoters of al qaeda now based overseas. his lectures which are described as fiery and incendiary have been found, downloaded on several terrorism suspects in north america, canada and the united kingdom. including it appears thoug
PBS
Nov 30, 2009 12:00pm EST
. my interrogater told me that the americans, america is waning, america's power is waning and we are going to be the superpower very soon. and we have allies all over the world, all over the region in lebanon, in iraq, in afghanistan, in venezuela, in bolivia. but at the same time they are afraid of individuals like me who are just doing their jobs, you know. i don't have that much power. most of these people that they arrested are just individuals and they were just demonstrating peacefully. so that is the mentality of the revolutionary guard. >> rose: are they surprised that there is that kind of hostility and that kind of in depth and in width of protest against them? >> yeah, i think they are -- they were surprised in the beginning. but then they enjoyed it. the reason i'm saying is that the revolutionary guard, they only thrive in chaos. they cannot operate in a normal situation. if there is any sense of normal see and transparency, that is the end of them because they are corrupt. they do many things surreptitiously, they have these foundations that are just answerable to t
PBS
Nov 16, 2009 6:00pm EST
in this relationship. i have talked about chi-merica as a single economy, china plus america is a key driver to the expansion of the decade from '98 to 2007. and still in very many ways the key to the way that the global economy works today with the chinese exports, the u.s. importing a huge trade deficit between the united states and china. and china intervening in international currency markets in order to keep its own currency weak. but thereby financing at least a part of the u.s. deficit. china has become the banker to the united states. and its policy of reserve accumulation has provided us nearly $2 trillion worth of effectively cheap or if not free credit to the united states. so this is a very paradoxical relationship and i would liken it perhaps to a marriage that was once happy but it is now approaching a rather rocky period if not divorce. >> lehrer: rocky period if not a divorce, jim fallows. >> i think divorce, you can imagine that only as an extreme circumstances. for example, a disagreement over taiwan which remains a contentious issue or some other political shock. and other
PBS
Nov 23, 2009 6:00pm EST
in america and europe. >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown presents images of the great depression through the lens of photographer dorothea lange. >> she developed an understanding that you would have much more power in the photographs because she features people. major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer is provided by: >> what the world needs now is energy. the energy to get the economy humming again. the energy to tackle challenges like climate change. what if that energy came from an energy company? every day, chevron invests $62 million in people, in ideas-- seeking, teaching, building. fueling growth around the world to move us all ahead. this is the power of human energy. chevron. >> we are intel, sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by wells fargo advisors. together, we'll go far. bnsf railway. and by toyota. and monsanto. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by cont
PBS
Nov 24, 2009 6:00pm EST
an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. and monsanto. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: president obama confirmed today he's ready to announce his decision on sending u.s. troops to afghanistan. he said he'd spell out his plans after thanksgiving. margaret warner has our lead story report. >> warner: the president met well into last night with his national security team, his tenth and final such session since september. today, it was widely reported he'll address the nation tuesday night. >> i'll be making an announcement on how we intend to move forward. >> warner: the president spoke of his decision at a joint news conference with indian prime minister manmohan singh, who was
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 12:00pm EST
lehman, where they're trying to put bank of america together with lehman not in september 2008 but in july. the c.e.o. of a.i.g. goes to tim geithner and, in august, and says we may have a problem and need you to turn us into a bank holding company. and geithner doesn't move on that. there's a lot of things we end up doing later yet dick fold asked for that in july and they thought that wasn't necessarily the best idea so there's questions about whether the government could have mitigated this better. and optically this doesn't look good. there is a meeting -- people talk about the gold medal -- goldman, sachs conspiracy theories and i am not sure i believe in the conspiracy theory per se but there is a scene in june 2008 in moscow, russia, in the hotel room of hank paulson where the entire board of goldman, sachs shows up and you say oh, my god, i don't even believe this is happening. i can't tell you anything untoward happened in the meeting but it does raise judgments about what of these people were making at the timente tavis: did you find it at all ironic that the team --
PBS
Nov 2, 2009 12:35pm EST
that i think still are standing in my way. but -- but you know, i like america. america is a wonderful country. and you know, and i wasn't down on multinationalism just because we seem to be forgetting how wonderful our own country is. you know, and we really have to help americans. you know, it's not just -- there are a lot of parts of america which should have a much better chance. >> rose: thank you for coming. >> thank you very much. >> rose: james watson, for the hour. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org suppose this grass is damp. thou'll get a soggy behind. aw, sit thee down. thy bottom's waterproof, isn't it? true, otherwise cups of tea would come straight through. you can't be too careful. i've seen men delirious with jungle fever. hey up. we're off again-- him and errol flynn in burma. not much jungle round here till you get nearly to leeds. i'd like to see you lot try to make a camp in a mango swamp. hardship? you don't know what hardship is. and you're going to tell
PBS
Nov 5, 2009 12:35pm EST
leaders, but what changed america on civil rights was a change of mind and heart on the part of millions of people at the grass-roots level. this is now the largest, fastest-growing movement in history. but the challenge is so great it needs to grow even faster. i have an organization called the alliance for climate protection. there's a web site, if i may mention it, repoweramerica.org and lots and lots of people are joining that organization. we work in collaboration with other groups, pushing toward the same objective and trying to get this legislation and this treaty. >> rose: our mutual friend, i assume, e.o. wilson... >> yes. >> rose: has written a book in which he makes... he's trying to find, you know, a... he's trying to find common cause with the religious community. >> yes. >> rose: and especially fundamental christian community. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by the way, the christian coalition has just joined this movement. because they believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth is the lord's and the fullness thereof. we
PBS
Nov 6, 2009 6:00pm EST
to not allow that to happen, remains unified in... for those who would exploit. happened in america, which makes it more troubling. that's why when we have some kind of incident like this happen, despite our attempt every day to enhance understanding of islam, end up being one step forward and two steps back for our commumity. just the facts we have to face in the post 9/11 era. >> reporter: today, american muslim groups roundly condemned the attack, the american arab anti-discrimination committee called him a "rogue" gunman. >> woodward: the other main story of the day was unemployment hitting double digits for the first time since 1983. the u.s. labor department announced the jobless rate rose to 10.2% in october, up four tenths. the economy lost another 190,000 jobs last month. at a congressional hearing, though, the head of the bureau of labor statistics said the rate of job losses is slowing. >> the last -- last three months the lost has been more mad rate than the prior three months are or the prior six months before that. last three months job losses average 188,000, that is signifi
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 6:00pm EST
. this is the power of human energy. chevron. >> what makes us an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. monsanto. producing more. conserving more. improving farmers' lives. that's sustainable agriculture. more at producemoreconservemore.com. intel. supporting coverage of innovation and the economy. >> and by wells fargo advisors. together, we'll go far. bnsf railway. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: president obama honored the victims of the fort hood massacre today. he led the mourners at an outdoor memorial service on the large army post in central texas. newshour correspondent kwame holman has our lead story report. ♪ >> reporter: thousands of family members, friends, and fellow soldiers
PBS
Nov 12, 2009 6:00pm EST
to supplement the steps we've already taken to put america back to work. that's what this forum is about. >> reporter: moments later, the president left the white house to begin a nine-day far east trip, full of its own challenges. he'll begin tomorrow in japan, where new prime minister yukio hatoyama is asserting some independence from the u.s. on foreign policy and trade. in china, the issues likely will include chinese concerns about u.s. budget deficits; u.s. complaints the chinese currency is undervalued; what to do about climate change; and how to deal with iran's and north korea's nuclear programs. but even overseas, the press of the health care initiative back home won't be far away. the president still is pushing democratic leaders in congress to pass a final bill by year's end. in recent days, mr. obama also has consoled the military community at fort hood, texas after 13 people were killed in last week's mass shootings. >> every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town; every dawn that a flag is unfurled; every moment that an american enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit o
PBS
Nov 24, 2009 12:35pm EST
sector and america and the world have really underspent on technology for the last ten years almost since going back to 2000, 1999. so i think we're going to see a lot of... we're going to see another wave of technological innovation and spending on technology. >> rose: what did you think when you saw warren buffett spent another $26 billion to buy what he didn't own of the burlington northern? >> well, i think it was... i think it was a great statement that he made that he was investing in america. and i'm certainly an american patriot. but i... i'm not sure that america's not going to have to pay the price of three to five years of relatively sluggish g.d.p. growth for this housing bubble and then for the wealth destruction that's occurred. so i'm not convinced that was the best place for him to put money. but i admire his motives and his statement. >> rose: if you talk to warren buffett, he will tell you his expertise is price not timing. which is yours? >> in the modern world, running a hedge fund, you've got to be able to do more than just say that it's a good value. there's got to b
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